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Incoming Professors of Fall 2017
Heather Brook Adams

Heather Brook Adams

Heather Brook Adams (M.A., English, Middlebury College's Bread Loaf School of English; M.A., Communication, University of Maryland; Ph.D., English, Pennsylvania State University) is relocating to Greensboro from Alaska, where she has been an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Heather's research performs feminist historiography of the recent past and investigates rhetorics of unwed pregnancy, reproduction, and motherhood. Her book project "Shame, Secrets, and Silences: The Rhetorical Legacy of Unwed Pregnancy in the United States Since 1960," explores rhetorical shaming and blaming practices, both private and public, that have shaped—and that continue to shape—discussions of women’s reproduction and sexual wellbeing.

Heather has taught a variety of courses including Feminist and Gender Rhetorics; History of Rhetoric; Research Writing; Advanced Composition; Literacy, Rhetoric, and Social Practice; Professional Writing; and Technical Writing. She has overseen UAA’s Professional Writing Internship and has served as a mentor for various undergraduate researchers. Her recent and forthcoming publications reflect both her research on reproduction (e.g., Women’s Studies in Communication; College English) as well as her feminist approaches to teaching and service work (e.g., Peitho; Alaska Native Studies Journal).

Aaron Beveridge

Aaron Beveridge

Aaron Beveridge’s research intersects writing and rhetorical theory with data science tools and methods. With a focus on programming, natural language processing, and data visualization, he is excited to contribute to the ongoing expansion of data-intensive research methods in rhetoric and writing studies. Grounded primarily in the study of digital content and social network trends, Aaron’s research and teaching interests also include technical communication, the rhetoric of science, media ecology, and maker culture. He has publications in print and forthcoming with Digital Humanities Quarterly, Computers and Composition Online, Composition Forum, Kairos, and The Journal of Open Source Software, and he is currently revising a monograph for publication, titled: Writing Macroscopes: Data Science, Digital Rhetoric, and the Future of the Internet.

Jennifer Park

Jennifer Park

Jennifer Park joins the Department of English at UNC Greensboro as assistant professor of English, specializing in early modern drama. She received her Ph.D. in English from UNC Chapel Hill and her B.A. from Yale University. Her current work focuses on the intersections of gender, science, visual culture, and performance in early modern England. She is working on a book manuscript on Vital Preservation which examines the gendering of materials that harnessed preservative power—sugar, mummy, milk, blood—and how they manifested in metaphor and on stage. Her second project explores technologies of word and image in early modern science, magic, mathematics, and game play and their implications for studies in early modern performance. Her research has been published in Studies in Philology and Renaissance and Reformation.

Emilia Phillips

Emilia Phillips

Emilia Phillips is the author of two poetry collections from the University of Akron Press, most recently Groundspeed (2016), and three chapbooks including Beneath the Ice Fish Like Souls Look Alike (Bull City Press, 2015). Her poems and lyric essays appear in Agni, Boston Review, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, The Kenyon Review, New England Review, Ninth Letter, Ploughshares, Poem-a-Day, Poetry, and elsewhere. She received StoryQuarterly's 2015 Nonfiction Prize and fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, The Kenyon Review Writers' Workshop, Vermont Studio Center, and elsewhere. Phillips is at work on two books: The Seconds Between Lightning and Thunder, her fourth poetry collection, and Wound Revisions, a collection of lyric essays. In addition to her creative work, Phillips contributes monthly craft essays to the Ploughshares blog and continues to develop a poetry broadside digitization project. Prior to UNCG, Phillips has taught previously at Centenary University, the College of William & Mary, and Gettysburg College, and at Virginia Commonwealth University where she received her MFA in Poetry.

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