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Frequently Asked Questions

For Students:

Q: What is the College Writing Program?

A: UNCG's College Writing Program helps prepare students to think critically and communicate effectively, so that they can successfully engage in a variety of academic and professional conversations during their time at UNCG and after graduation. Serving most of the university’s students through three core classes, the College Writing Program at UNCG teaches writing through an awareness of rhetoric so that students can craft their arguments with a specific audience, situation, and purpose in mind. Through an emphasis on close reading and critical analysis, we also help students recognize the rhetorical elements in others' arguments, so that they are better equipped to make their own decisions in a world full of persuasion. Our small class size allows us to give detailed feedback on multiple drafts of student writing, dialog with students individually through at least one set of conferences every semester, and develop a personal rapport with students. Our goal is to help students become scholars and citizens who are ready to engage in their communities and around the globe.

Q: What is ENG 101 (College Writing I)?

A: ENG 101 is a course in academic writing, focusing on analysis, argument, and critical reflection using the tenets of rhetoric. This course includes instruction in drafting, revising, and compilation of a final portfolio.

English 101 satisfies 3 of the 6 hours of the Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) requirement at UNCG, which asserts that students “gain skills in intellectual discourse, including constructing cogent arguments, locating, synthesizing and analyzing documents, and writing and speaking clearly, coherently, and effectively.” (More information here)
In addition, English 101 is designed to address Learning Goal #1 (LG1) in the UNCG General Education Program. This is the ability to “think critically, communicate effectively, and develop appropriate fundamental skills in quantitative and information literacies.(More information here)

The following are English 101 Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs), each of which corresponds to both the GRD goals and to LG1:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the content and structure of complex texts (written, oral, and/or visual in nature);
  2. Compose cogent, evidence-based, argumentative texts;
  3. Identify and employ the rhetorical triangle, the canons, and the appeals in both formal and informal discourse;
  4. Summarize, quote, paraphrase, and synthesize source material in support of an argument;
  5. Employ drafting, peer review, and revision techniques in order to improve content, style, and structure of their own writing;
  6. Appraise their own composing abilities and composing processes through critical reflection.

Q: What type of work will I do in ENG 101?

A: The major assignments for College Writing I will be composed of formal, argument-based essays. In addition, there will be a variety of assigned readings which will discuss important rhetorical concepts and/or allow for students to practice their rhetorical analysis skills.

Q: How much writing is required in ENG 101?

A:The culminating assignment for the course is a portfolio of the student’s work, worth 30-40% of the final grade. The portfolio includes an argument-based, 4-6 page rationale essay which analyzes the student’s writing processes and learning in relation to the student learning outcomes of English 101. In addition, it articulates, for the portfolio reader(s), the reasoning behind the choices made/selections included that demonstrate both processes of learning and polished writing. In this portfolio, students further revise the formal essays and make choices about the informal writing included. The portfolio also contains a demonstration of the student’s writing processes for one or more formal essays as decided by the instructor. This process is demonstrated through the assignment, activities, peer comments, drafts, and revisions, as well as any other material the instructor requires. This demonstration provides the proof of the student’s specific writing practices as referred to in the rationale. The rationale essay is included in the 20-24 pages of polished prose required for the course.  

Q: How much reading can I expect in ENG 101? What types of texts can I expect?

A: Students read, on average, 25-50 pages per week from either a course reader/anthology, other course readings posted on Canvas, internet-based texts, or a book-length text or texts. Texts may also be read multiple times, for different rhetorical purposes, and instructors may allow multiple, comparable texts to be under discussion at any given time. In addition, student drafts and revisions for peer review may be included in this number. An assigned full-length feature film viewed in or out of class constitutes one week’s readings. Other online videos such as advertisements and YouTube videos work from the premise that 2 minutes equates to a page.
Course readings are primarily non-fiction prose, including argument-based essays and other examples of scholarly, socio-cultural/media/communications, or journalistic-based writing. English 101 is a course in rhetoric and writing; therefore, if course texts include literature or film(s), student work on these texts (including essay assignments) will be explicitly rooted in rhetorical analysis.

Q: How will these courses help me if I’m not an English major?

A:While most students who take College Writing I are not English majors, this course tries to enhance each student’s ability to carefully analyze complex texts, perform academic research, and make cogent, evidence-based written arguments while heightening each student’s awareness of his or her own composition and revision practices. These important communication skills prove valuable across a variety of fields of study and professions, since collaboration amongst professional colleagues is commonplace.

Q: How large are classes?

A: Classes are limited at 22 students and sections tend to be full.

Q: When should I take ENG 101?

A: Since the reading and writing skills honed in College Writing I can be important foundational skills for general academic study, it is recommended that students take College Writing I their freshman year.

Q: Are all sections of ENG 101 the same?

A: While some of the materials and procedures may vary slightly, all College Writing I courses will address the fundamentals of rhetoric with the use of Rhetorical Approaches to College Writing, and all sections have the same writing requirements culminating in a formal writing portfolio.

Q: What’s the difference between ENG 101, FMS 115, and RCO 101?

A:While all of these courses share the same learning outcomes, the Freshman Seminar courses (FMS) allow instructors additional freedom in selecting their course materials and oftentimes these courses are themed, for example, “Make Writing Your Superpower.” These courses may also have additional markers such as Speaking Intensive (SI). For descriptions of FMS Courses, please visit the Freshman Seminar Program’s website. RCO 101 is a Freshman Seminar version of ENG 101, for students enrolled in Residential College

Q: Can I receive credit for both ENG 101 and FMS 115/RCO 101?

A: No. These are equivalent courses.

Q: What is the portfolio and why does this take the place of a final exam?

A:The culminating assignment for the course is a portfolio of the student’s work, worth 30-40% of the final grade. The portfolio includes an argument-based, 4-6 page rationale essay which analyzes the student’s writing processes and learning in relation to the student learning outcomes of English 101.                          
In addition, it articulates, for the portfolio reader(s), the reasoning behind the choices made/selections included that demonstrate both processes of learning and polished writing. In this portfolio, students further revise the formal essays and make choices about the informal writing included. The portfolio also contains a demonstration of the student’s writing processes for one or more formal essays as decided by the instructor. This demonstration may include the assignment, activities, peer comments, drafts, and revisions as well as any other material the instructor requires, and it provides the proof of the student’s specific writing practices as referred to in the rationale. The rationale essay is included in the 20-24 pages of polished prose required for the course.

Q: Why are ENG 101 and ENG 102 not considered Writing Intensive (WI)?

A:While there is a considerable amount of writing involved in both College Writing I and College Writing II, the courses are centered on learning how to improve a student’s formal writing skills rather than being a class that utilizes a significant amount of formal writing to help students explore and learn another subject.

Q: What is the difference between ENG 101 and ENG 102?

A: College Writing II (ENG 102) is a course in research-based writing, focused on analysis, argument, and critical reflection using the tenets of rhetoric. Instruction provided will deal with research methodologies as relevant to college writing projects. This course does not require a portfolio for all sections, although individual instructors may use the portfolio as the culminating assignment for the course.

Q: Is there a prerequisite for ENG 102?

A: College Writing I must be completed before a student can enroll in ENG 102. This can be achieved with ENG 101, FMS 115, or RCO 101.

Q: What is ENG 103?

A: Essentials of Professional and Business Writing (ENG 103) focuses on the written skills needed for workplace success. This course emphasizes process strategies for clear, concise, and accurate messages. It also develops skills in producing professional documents, analyzing the writing of others, and collaborating on written assignments.

Q: Is there a prerequisite for ENG 103?

A:College Writing I must be completed before a student can enroll in ENG 103. This can be achieved with ENG 101, FMS 115, or RCO 101.

Q: Can I place out of any English courses with AP credit, the International Baccalaureate Program, etc.?

A:

AP English—Language and Composition
A score of a 3 on the English—Lang. and Comp. AP exam will grant a student 3 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101.
A score of a 4 on the English—Lang. and Comp. AP exam will grant a student 6 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101 and ENG 102.
A score of a 5 on the English—Lang. and Comp. AP exam will grant a student 9 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101, ENG 102, and ENG 104 (Approach to Literature).

AP English—Literature and Composition
A score of a 3 on the English—Lit. and Comp. AP exam will grant a student 3 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 104.
A score of a 4 on the English—Lit. and Comp. AP exam will grant a student 6 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101 and ENG 104 (with a writing intensive marker).
A score of a 5 on the English—Lit. and Comp. AP exam will grant a student 9 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101, ENG 102, and ENG 104 (with a writing Intensive marker).

International Baccalaureate Program (IB) English A1
A minimum score of a 4 or 5 from the IB’s English A1 will grant a student 6 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101 and ENG 104.
A minimum score of a 6 or 7 from the IB’s English A1 will grant a student 9 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101 and ENG 104 as well as an additional English course at the 200 level. The specific course to be awarded will be based on consultation within the department. Contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies in English for more information.

College Board SAT: Writing Exam (a section of the current 2400 point SAT exam)
A score of 650 or above on the SAT Writing Exam will grant a student exemption from ENG 101, but no credit hours.

SAT Subject Tests: Writing Exam (formerly SAT II)
A score of between a 710 and 759 on the SAT Writing Exam will grant a student exemption from ENG 101, but no credit hours.
A score of between a 760 and 800 on the SAT Writing Exam will grant a student 3 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 101.

SAT Subject Tests: English Literature
A score of between 700-749 (650-699 for tests taken before March 1995) will grant a student exemption from ENG 212, but no credit hours.
A score of between 750-800 (700-800 for tests taken before March 1995) will grant a student 3 credit hours and will take the place of ENG 212.

Q: Where can I go for extra help with my writing?

A:The UNCG Writing Center is a valuable resource for students to receive additional aid with their writing in face-to-face meetings or through online consultation. More information (along with a space to make an appointment) can be found here: https://writingcenter.uncg.edu/.

Q: Where can I go for help with my presentation skills?

A:The UNCG Speaking Center (located next to the Writing Center) supports UNCG students, staff, faculty, and community members of Greensboro in their ongoing process of becoming more confident and competent oral communicators through instruction, collaborative consultation, and feedback. More information can be found here: https://speakingcenter.uncg.edu/.

Additionally, The UNCG Digital ACT Studio, housed on the lower level of the Jackson Library, provides resources for UNCG's students, faculty, and staff to conceptualize, draft, and refine their multimedia projects, including web pages, digital images, digital video, digital audio, PowerPoint and more. They provide assistance with the rhetorical and aesthetic aspects of developing and communicating ideas through media. More information can be found here: http://digitalactstudio.uncg.edu

In addition, the Digital Media Commons, also housed on the lower level of the Jackson library, offers how-to assistance with the technical aspects of digital and multimedia projects. More information can be found here: http://library.uncg.edu/spaces/dmc/

Q: What kind of support is offered for non-native speakers?

A: UNCG offers a section of College Writing I for non-native English speakers which is listed as ENG 101N. Additionally, we encourage all students, including non-native English speakers, to make use of the UNCG Writing Center and the UNCG Speaking Center.

For TAs and One-Year Lecturers (Current and Prospective):

Q: How many students can I expect to have in my course?

A: Enrollment for writing courses is limited to 22 students per course section, and these sections are often full.  Enrollment for literature courses is limited to 40 students.

Q: Is conferencing required?

A: For writing courses, students will have at least one conference during the semester with their instructors, preferably at or near midterm. The conference time is outlined in the syllabus, and accounted for via the cancellation of classes. Typically, one week of class is cancelled in order to accommodate conferences with 22 students.

Q: Do instructors have to teach a common text?

A: All College Writing courses are required to use the current edition of Rhetorical Approaches to College Writing. Additionally, instructors may require additional texts or materials for the course.

Additionally, all TAs and One-Year Lecturers are required to use Lenses: Perspectives on Literature for introductory literature courses.

Q: Can I require my students to visit the Writing Center?

A: While students are commonly encouraged to visit the Writing Center for additional assistance with their writing, the sheer volume of students enrolled in College Writing I makes it impossible for instructors to require all students to meet with Writing Center staff during the semester.

Q: Will I know if one of my students uses the Writing Center?

A: If requested, the Writing Center staff can contact a student’s instructor to inform him or her of the student’s usage of the Writing Center.

Q: Can instructors incorporate extra-literary texts into their course, such as visual media?

A: While the majority of texts should be of a written nature, instructors are allowed to incorporate visual media (such as advertisements) or short films into the course.

Q: Are all instructors specialized in Rhetoric and Composition?

A: While instructors come in with a wide variety of specialties within the field of English, all instructors receive training in advance of teaching.

Q: Is there a training program required for new instructors?

A: Yes. Each August, there is a weeklong training program to cover policies, course requirements, textbooks, potential assignments, best teaching practices, etc.

Q: How do I set up a tour/orientation of the Writing Center for my class?

A: A Writing Center orientation can be arranged through the Writing Center’s website here: https://writingcenter.uncg.edu/services/request-an-orientation/

Q: How can I arrange for my class to have a Library Orientation session to learn more about formal research?

A: Jenny Dale is the librarian who serves as First Year Instruction Coordinator and can help schedule Library Instruction for ENG 101, ENG 102, and Communications Studies courses. She can be reached at (336) 256-0240 or jedale2@uncg.edu.

Q: How do I handle plagiarism/academic integrity cases?

A: Academic Integrity cases are handled through the Dean of Students Office. Detailed procedural information can be found on the Dean of Students website at: http://sa.uncg.edu/dean/academic-integrity/.

Q: How can I get access to the instructor resources online spaces?

A: For access to the ENG Teaching Resources online space (housed on Canvas), please contact the Associate Director of the College Writing Program.

Q: What classes might I teach as a TA?

A: While ENG 101 is by far the most common course for English TAs and One-Year Lecturers (in part based on student enrollment), there are a variety of classes which TAs have taught, including literature courses.  These courses as well as their descriptions are below:

WRITING COURSES:

ENG 101 College Writing I
A course in academic writing, focusing on analysis, argument, and critical reflection using the tenets of rhetoric. Instruction in drafting, revising, and compilation of a final portfolio.

ENG 101 College Writing I N
A course in academic writing, focusing on analysis, argument, and critical reflection, using the tenets of rhetoric.  Instruction in drafting, revising, and compilation of a final portfolio.  This course also focuses on improving reading comprehension, grammar skills related to writing, building vocabulary, and writing complex sentences and paragraphs. It also includes a focus on oral communication skills, both informal and formal.

ENG 102 College Writing II
A course in research-based writing, focused on analysis, argument, and critical reflection using the tenets of rhetoric. Instruction in research methodologies as relevant to college writing projects.

ENG 103 Essentials of Professional and Business Writing
Focus: written skills needed for workplace success. Emphasizes process strategies for clear, concise, and accurate messages. Develops skills in producing professional documents, analyzing the writing of others, and collaborating on written assignments.

ENG 230 Writing for the Workplace and Public Audiences
Reading and writing multiple genres of expository prose, focusing on the products of different writing communities in workplace and public settings.

LITERATURE COURSES

ENG 104 Approach to Literature
Critical reading and analysis of fiction, poetry and drama with an emphasis on a variety of major themes and their relevance to contemporary life.

ENG 105 Introduction to Narrative
Critical reading and analysis of American and British novels, short stories, and narrative poems. Attention to historical, cultural, and literary backgrounds as appropriate.

ENG 106 Introduction to Poetry
Critical reading and analysis of British and American lyric, dramatic, and narrative poetry. Attention to historical, cultural, and literary backgrounds as appropriate.

ENG 107 Introduction to Drama
Critical reading and analysis of British and American drama. Attention to historical, cultural, and literary backgrounds, especially the Continental dramatic background, as appropriate.

ENG 108 Topics in British and American Literature
Variable topics. Offerings may include Southern Writers, The Mystery Novel, Women Writers, The Imperial Imagination, and Grail Literature.

ENG 109 Introduction to Shakespeare
Intensive study of a limited number of plays (and perhaps some sonnets) using such approaches as textual analysis, historical material, filmed versions, attendance at productions, discussion, writing, and performance study.

ENG 110 World Literature in English
Introductory survey of literature written in English by authors from regions outside the United States and the British Isles—the West Indies, India, Canada, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand.

ENG 204 Non-Western Literary Classics
Reading and analysis of the most influential literary texts of Non-Western cultures, ancient through modern; readings include translations of prose and poetry from Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.

ENG 208 Topics in Global Literature
Variable topics, with emphasis on regional interconnections. Offerings may include Europe at War, World Women Writers, Literature and Revolution, and Holocaust Literature.

ENG 209 Topics in Non-Western Literature
Variable topics, with emphasis on regional interconnections. Offerings may include South Asian Diaspora, Postcolonial Childhood, Afro-Caribbean Writers, and Australasian Writers.

ENG 210 Literature and the Arts
Exploration of the relationships between literary and extraliterary arts such as music, visual arts, cinema, and architecture. Extraliterary focus will vary.

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